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In our current issue, our collective has sought to fulfil one of the key responsibilities of the journal to the AAANZ membership: to reflect the wide variety of art historical scholarship in Australia and New Zealand. At the same time, we have not set out to structure the issue in the way that we, and previous editors over the last few years, have done through a call for papers based on a particular theme. Both with and without our encouragement, however, the contributing authors have favoured transdisciplinary methodologies. Hence the first two essays share an interest in the intersection of art and philosophy. One takes the form of an interview, conducted by Sue Best, Philipa Rothfield and ANZJA editor Helen McDonald. Elizabeth Grosz is a philosopher who is highly esteemed by art historians for her work on French philosophies and sexual difference. In this interview, organised by ANZJA, Professor Grosz discusses work towards her eagerly anticipated book on art and Deleuze. From a very different philosophical perspective, Damon Young provides an introduction to Bourdieu’s theory of art and class distinction, considering the usefulness of its application in art historical discourse. In a more empirical analysis of art, entitled “Fine Arts of Distinction”, Petra Kayser examines the written thoughts of Wenzel Jamnitzer and Bernard Palissy, two artists working for northern European princely patrons in the second half of the sixteenth century, who claimed high status for their crafts through their intellectual work. Carol Archer’s essay on the art of Judy Watson is underpinned by a feminist analysis that acknowledges the artist’s membership of a group with culturally specific ownership of knowledge.

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Editorial

This issue of the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Art (ANZJA) is the second to be published during 2006 and the last that will be produced by the current editorial team based at the University of Melbourne.

Reflecting on the issues that we have published since 2004, we observe that they have been linked by a consistent transdisciplinarity. It is clear that art historians have moved well beyond disputes surrounding the importation of methodologies that marked the appearance of theory in Australia in the late 1970s, and that the expansion of epistemes across disciplinary boundaries has in many ways been accepted. A legacy of tensions and ambivalent attitudes towards this expansion nevertheless marks current debates in our discipline, not least those surrounding visual culture studies. Our first issue of the Journal, “Art and Terror,” published in late 2004, dealt with a putatively contemporary theme, in which the different methods of visual culture and art history were brought together. Our second issue on the question of “Masculinities” (2005) emerged from a recent development in studies of art and sexual difference. Discussing a broad range of visual material, including film, painting, photography, urban space, drag performance and public memorials, it combined art history and cultural studies approaches to explore the various ways in which masculinity has been performed in historical and contemporary cultures. Our third and fourth issues, combined in the double issue, “South” (2006), dealt with a theme that is very much of the present, the prospect of multiple, “world” art histories that are involved in  the intersection of geography with art history. Despite all the methodological lessons of the past three decades, and world-wide challenges to the habitual exclusion of southern hemisphere histories, the “world art history” emerging in Europe and North America still shows signs of a northern bias. With “South” we created a forum for meeting the particular challenge this debate offers to scholars and artists working in the southern hemisphere.

In our current issue, our collective has sought to fulfil one of the key responsibilities of the journal to the AAANZ membership: to reflect the wide variety of art historical scholarship in Australia and New Zealand. At the same time, we have not set out to structure the issue in the way that we, and previous editors over the last few years, have done through a call for papers based on a particular theme. Both with and without our encouragement, however, the contributing authors have favoured transdisciplinary methodologies. Hence the first two essays share an interest in the intersection of art and philosophy. One takes the form of an interview, conducted by Sue Best, Philipa Rothfield and ANZJA editor Helen McDonald. Elizabeth Grosz is a philosopher who is highly esteemed by art historians for her work on French philosophies and sexual difference. In this interview, organised by ANZJA, Professor Grosz discusses work towards her eagerly anticipated book on art and Deleuze. From a very different philosophical perspective, Damon Young provides an introduction to Bourdieu’s theory of art and class distinction, considering the usefulness of its application in art historical discourse. In a more empirical analysis of art, entitled “Fine Arts of Distinction”, Petra Kayser examines the written thoughts of Wenzel Jamnitzer and Bernard Palissy, two artists working for northern European princely patrons in the second half of the sixteenth century, who claimed high status for their crafts through their intellectual work. Carol Archer’s essay on the art of Judy Watson is underpinned by a feminist analysis that acknowledges the artist’s membership of a group with culturally specific ownership of knowledge.

In bringing the tenure of this editorial team to a close we would like to acknowledge the generosity of those who have helped us, encouraged us and given us support over the last few years. We would like first to acknowledge the work of previous mem- bers of the team, Daniel Palmer and Karen Burns, whose contributions to earlier issues were highly valued. We are indebted to the support and counsel of Jill Bennett, President of the AAANZ. Her steady leadership of the Association and her enthusiastic encouragement of our efforts are greatly appreciated. We would also like to thank Peta Landman, Business Manager of the Association, for her sound advice and prompt replies to all our queries, and for her important work in distributing the Journal to our readers. Our publisher, Patty Brown, deserves special recognition for her perceptive contribution to maintaining the visual style of the Journal, for organising the design and copyediting, and for her remarkable generosity and flexibility. We would like to acknowledge the people who have provided support of a more material nature, including Tony Sagona, Head of the School of Art History, Cinema, Classics and Archaeology at the University of Melbourne, who generously agreed to house the Journal at the School and provided resources for our earlier issues. We would also like to thank Stuart Macintyre from the Faculty of Arts at The University of Melbourne for his financial support in the form of grants from the Research and Graduate Studies Committee, and Kate Darian-Smith, Nikos Papastergiadis and John Murphy for allowing us to meet at the Australian Centre at The University of Melbourne. Much work takes place before the final manuscript of each issue is committed to print, and we would like to thank all of our authors, published and unpublished, and our referees, who have given their time freely and anonymously, and who have ably assisted us in our efforts to maintain the highest standards of scholarship at the ANZJA.

Charles Green, Caroline Jordan, Helen McDonald, Anthony White

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Table of Contents

 

EDITORIAL

ARTICLES

Helen Mcdonald, Sue Best, Philipa Rothfield, Art and Deleuze: A Round Table interview with Elizabeth Grosz

Damon A. YoungThe Fine Arts of Distinction: Bourdieu on Society and Art

Petra Kayser, The Intellectual and the Artisan: Wenzel Jamnitzer and Bernard Palissy

Carol Archer, The Ambivalent Paintings of Judy Watson

REVIEWS

Elizabeth Edwards, Eye Contact: Photographing Indigenous Australians – Jane Lydon

John E. Stanton The Art of Narritjin Maymuru – Howard Morphy, Pip Deveson and Katie Hayne

Chris Wallace-Crabbe, Voyage and Landfall: The Art of Jan Senbergs – Patrick McCaughey

Caroline Jordan, Fiona Hall – Julie Ewington

David Teh, On Looking at Looking: The Art and Politics of Ian Burn – Ann Stephen

Ann Stephen, Modernism: Designing a New World 1914–1939 – Christopher Wilk ed.

Daniel Palmer, Materializing New Media: Embodiment in Information Aesthetics –Anna Munster

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